Monthly Archives: November 2013

How are you saying thank you?

I’ve noticed something about what makes a thank you message stick in the heart of this case for support writer and donor. Let me explain.

I participated in a strategic planning session awhile back. The facilitator, a super smart woman, had made a donation to the charity that was in planning mode. She reported back that the organization had promptly followed up with a tax receipt and a thank you email. Check. Check. Very nice.Saying thanks: Case for Support

Some organizations have a policy that anyone who makes a donation of $250 or more gets a phone call from their relationship manager. If the gift is large enough the phone call comes from the executive director or a board member.

These are good strategies.

As a donor, I have received phone calls from charities. At the end of some calls I feel terrific about being invested in the organization’s work. The exchange feels authentic and sincere. But with other organizations I can almost picture the relationship manager crossing my name of a list at the end of the call. Check. The strategy was executed, but not a lot of connection was made.

The thing I’ve noticed about giving and receiving thanks has to do with putting purpose before plan. Continue reading

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The secret ingredient in a great story & how to get my mother’s attention.

Last Friday night I had dinner with a girlfriend. The leaves swirled past the windows, while inside my friend’s home we warmed ourselves with good wine, good food and great conversation. I arrived at 5:30 p.m. and, all of a sudden, it was 10:40 p.m. The conversation was that good. What made it so? We talked about things we both cared about. There is the secret to a good story: make it about something the hearer cares deeply about and you will have their attention.Storytelling and Case for Support

The temptation is to make the stories in our cases for support about the organization and the good work it does. When we do this we miss what a psychologist calls the ‘self-interest’ element. A marketer calls it the ‘what’s in it for me’ factor. We all come to the table with self interest. That is how we are wired as human beings. It’s true whether we are skimming a newspaper, learning that a storm is in the forecast or hearing a story about a remarkable charity. We tune out the things that don’t affect us and tune in to the things that do. Continue reading

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