Tag Archives: donor relations

How are you saying thank you?

I’ve noticed something about what makes a thank you message stick in the heart of this case for support writer and donor. Let me explain.

I participated in a strategic planning session awhile back. The facilitator, a super smart woman, had made a donation to the charity that was in planning mode. She reported back that the organization had promptly followed up with a tax receipt and a thank you email. Check. Check. Very nice.Saying thanks: Case for Support

Some organizations have a policy that anyone who makes a donation of $250 or more gets a phone call from their relationship manager. If the gift is large enough the phone call comes from the executive director or a board member.

These are good strategies.

As a donor, I have received phone calls from charities. At the end of some calls I feel terrific about being invested in the organization’s work. The exchange feels authentic and sincere. But with other organizations I can almost picture the relationship manager crossing my name of a list at the end of the call. Check. The strategy was executed, but not a lot of connection was made.

The thing I’ve noticed about giving and receiving thanks has to do with putting purpose before plan. Continue reading

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How what you don’t see can hurt you.

My husband and I enjoy being outdoors. On weekdays we walk a loop around Crescent Beach (near Vancouver, BC) and on weekends we go a little further afield, often to the North Shore Mountains. Awhile back, we walked a trail that connects South Surrey and Tsawwassen. Once the path veers away from the highway, it becomes peaceful and pretty as it hugs the shoreline. On that particular day, we walked for about an hour and a half before we turned around. www.thecaseforsupport.com

I was struck by how different the path looked when viewed from the opposite direction. I saw the path from a different perspective. There were plants and trees I hadn’t noticed when I was pointing north. Most startling to me: I had missed seeing an entire pier that had washed up on the shore. It was badly damaged, but it was there, and I had missed it. Continue reading

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